Strict Standards: Non-static method Pager::factory() should not be called statically in /home/wapworld/public_html/web/w_posts.php on line 33
JUMBEE (spirits in the caribbean)
ava Smarty: In which country is the river Yangtze? (5 chars)
ava saahir: 9
ava
A Jumbee, Jumbie or Mendo is a type of mythological spirit or demon in Caribbean folklore. Jumbee is the generic name given to all malevolent entities; however, there are numerous kinds of jumbees, reflecting the Caribbean’s complex history and ethnic makeup of the region, drawing on African, Amerindian, East Indian, Dutch, English, and even Chinese mythology. Belief in this creature is widely held by people in the English-speaking Caribbean states that were colonized by the British and which practised Obeah, a form of mystical wizardry that encompassed traditional African beliefs merged with Western European, primarily Anglican, images and beliefs concerning the dead. Various islands, including Antigua and Barbuda in the east to Jamaica in the north and as far south as Trinidad, have had a long held tradition of folklore that includes the jumbee. Different cultures have different concepts of jumbees, but the general idea is that people who have been evil are destined to become instruments of evil in death!
image image
Characteristics;
In the folk religion of Montserrat, a jumbie is a ghost, or spirit of the dead. Jumbies are said to possess humans during ceremonies called jumbie dances, which are accompanied by jumbie drums. Four couples perform a set of five progressively quicker quadrilles during the jumbie dance, switching out with other couples until someone is eventually possessed by a jumbie. Jumbies receive numerous small offerings from Montserratians, such as a few drops of rum or food; they are also the subject of numerous superstitions. The spirit separates from the body three days after death, and so the havoc begins. Jumbies can shape-shift, usually taking the form of a dog, pig or more likely a cat.

There are many recommended ways to avoid or escape jumbie encounters;
> leaving a pair of shoes outside your door, jumbies don't have feet and will spend the entire night trying on the shoes to get them to fit before moving onto you.
> leaving a heap of sand or salt or rice outside your door, jumbies are compelled to count every grain before the sun rises.
> when coming home late at night, walk backwards so that a jumbie will be unable to follow you inside.
> if one is being chased by a jumbie, cross a river, as they cannot follow over water.
> leaving a rope with many knots by your door step. Jumbies love to try to untie knots, so they will forget about you.

Types of Jumbees;

> BackooBackoo;
may actually be derived from a Nigerian Yoruba entity called Abiku. The Abiku is the spirit of a baby that has died before being named. They are usually represented by small wooden statues in Yoruba homes as a form of appeasement to the spirit of the deceased. The Guyanese Backoo may actually be derived from these statues. Guyanese Backoos are described as short men with large eyes, long arms and legs, and most conspicuously an absence of kneecaps. A spirit of small stature that pelts stones at houses and moves objects within a house. He is supposed to live on banana and milk. Stories abound of the existence of backoos in Georgetown and other areas in Guyana. The legend could have come from Suriname. The spirit is said to be trapped in a corked bottle unless released. Backoos are active mainly at night; it is said that a satisfied backoo will answer the wishes of its owner.

> Chudail/Churile;
Chudail/Churile, spirit of a woman who dies in childbirth, leaving her baby alive. Restless, owing to the separation from her baby, the choorile roams at night, crying mournfully. When people cry all the time, or run around crazy like something is lost, they are usually called churile, although only most older generation Guyanese people do this. The word chudail/churile means witch in Urdu and Hindi.

> Massacooramaan;
The Massacooramaan, also known as Sea Master, is a huge, hairy, man-like creature that lives in rivers in the interior. The name is derived from the chapters of redemption. This beast is almost untamed-looking, with the appearance of a wild Berhane, but don't be fooled. It is a fearsome thing that capsizes small boats and eats the occupants.

> Moon-Gazer;
The Moon-Gazer is a Juf

> Canaima;
Canaima, the Amerindian version of a werewolf. It is usually described as an Amerindian man with the ability to change himself into a Jaguar. Canaimas can be good or bad depending on the person and are to be feared and respected regardless.

> Bush Dai Dai;
Bush Dai-Dai is a Guyanese spirit of Amerindian and Afro-Guyanese heritage The Bush Dai Dai usually takes the form of a beautiful woman who comes to the camps of Guyanese miners. After entering the camp and having sexual intercourse with the miners the young woman usually changes into a wild animal and eats her victims as they sleep.
(20:26) Fri, 11 Mar 11
ava
great topic Lake
(01:22) Sat, 12 Mar 11
ava
smiley good topic,thanks...
(23:23) Fri, 11 Mar 11
ava
interesting topic, great work dragonsmiley....
(22:34) Fri, 11 Mar 11
ava
*omg* it's true! Very true smiley
(20:41) Fri, 11 Mar 11